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Waiting Games and Midsummer Dreams

This week’s been all about waiting – waiting sometimes calmly and sometimes in abject terror for the troublesome symptoms in my left eye to settle and waiting for happier news from Lily and Rose. For a control freak who likes instant results the uncertainty of all this waiting is somewhat testing so I’m taking my mind off it by joining in the promo for fellow Choc Lit author Alison May's new novel Midsummer Dreams which is out this Friday 12 June – not very long to wait at all!

Alison’s given us three dream-related prompts to think about… which in my current state of heightened tension rather reflect my immediate concerns, however, here we go!

I had a dream: Ooh, of waking up and being able to see perfectly! Imagine a day that didn’t begin like the blur of an impressionist painting speckled with shrapnel and ghostly floaters! Of being free from glasses and contact lenses. Ah, but that is just a dream.

I had a nightmare: Hmm, the opposite of above, but living in fear is living in a cage so best to think positively. When we were in Edinburgh recently, we listened to record producer Robin Millar’s Desert Island Discs. Robin Millar’s been registered blind since the age of 16 and eventually lost his sight completely. His sheer determination to meet his condition head-on is a remarkable demonstration of triumph over disaster.

My dream for the future: If we could all just be a little kinder to each other, to treat others as we would wish to be treated – wouldn’t that make the world a better place?

Watch out for other bloggers dream-related posts this week. You can buy Alison’s Midsummer Dreams here:

Four people. Four messy lives. One party that changes everything …
Emily is obsessed with ending her father’s new relationship – but is blind to the fact that her own is far from perfect.
Dominic has spent so long making other people happy that he’s hardly noticed he’s not happy himself.
Helen has loved the same man, unrequitedly, for ten years. Now she may have to face up to the fact that he will never be hers.
Alex has always played the field. But when he finally meets a girl he wants to commit to, she is just out of his reach.
At a midsummer wedding party, the bonds that tie the four friends together begin to unravel and show them that, sometimes, the sensible choice is not always the right one.

The painting is 'Dinas and Carn Ingli from the Coast' by Tom Tomos

Comments

Clare Chase said…
Really sorry you’re having to deal with so many things at the moment, Chris; I do hope everything's much more reassuring soon. I love your dream for the future. That would solve a lot of problems, and make the world a much nicer place!
Frances said…
Chris, I do wish those pesky visual intruders would vanish. I can well imaginie that waiting for that next appointment is very unpleasant. (I'm happy to say that my own recent skin doc check up resulted in a good report. Whew.)

On the topic of dreams, I admit that my sleep is on the sound side, and I rarely actually am aware of my dreams. But when I am...oh wow. I think of them as puzzles to figure out...full of puns, some visual translations of verbal sound-alikes, as my sleeping mind has tried to file away new events or impressions.

Please pass along my praise of this painting to Tom.

xo
Flowerpot said…
I'm with you on the eyesight bit - being blind as a bat without my lenses too! Also see my post about my friend Paul who is walking for peace in July.... the book sounds great - definitely on my TBR list!
Chris Stovell said…
It's been a very stressful time, Clare so thank you for your good wishes. X

I'm really pleased to read about your good news, Frances. This has been rather frightening so I do hope it settles down. Tom will be pleased - thank you!

Sue, I'm not doing too well with mine at the moment and I'm coming over to read your post right now. Great - thank you, Alison will be delighted.

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